Ridiculous Thoughts

A Visual Pantser’s Guide to Plotting and Planning (Part Two)

70879948_19fd7946c1_o

You’ve got a fair idea of how you should go about plotting your novel (see Part One) but you’ve found yourself stuck, coming up with cliche twists, turns and ideas.

You sit down with a packet of felt tip pens, a large piece of paper and your main idea. You write it down in the middle of the page, surround it by a cloud and draw the first branch coming from the centre of the page.

Now what? 

Continue reading

Twitter; Worth the Work?

The Non-Writer’s Guide to a Writer’s World: (Part One) Twitter

9359575921_5d0d1af224_o

Twitter is a fantastic platform, in my opinion, and one that many people don’t seem to understand. I’m often met with blank stares from my non-writer friends (who are also incidentally not on Twitter) when they learn I’m on Twitter, “What do you do on there? Isn’t it just a waste of time?” they all ask.

Continue reading

Use Trigger Words to Help You Plot

A Visual Pantser’s Guide to Plotting and Planning (Part One)

1275267137_9f89cd03fd_o

This time you’re going to do it, you’ve decided, you will plot before you write, you won’t make the same mistakes again. This first draft is going to be amazing and you’ll get it done in record time cause you won’t get stuck. That’s right, you tell yourself, if I have a plan I won’t get stuck.

Fail to plan, plan to fail.

(Right?)

Now to begin…

Continue reading

Pareidolia and Writing

p11302321

One of my most vivid memories of primary school here in New Zealand is of the ‘creative writing’ period; an hour in the day wherein we’d do nothing but write. Perhaps that’s a little bit of an exaggeration; this was at a time when we were earning our ‘pen licence’ (you were only given permission to write in pen if you were ‘neat’ enough) and essentially learning how to properly form letters.

Continue reading

Liebster Award

award2

I was nominated for the Liebster Award by two bloggers: Paola Crespo from ‘Writing and Rewriting’ and Joanna Meyer from ‘Just a Lyric in a Children’s Rhyme’. And as such I’ll answer both lots of questions (as briefly as possible) in this one post rather than do two separate posts of pretty much the same thing. Here it goes!

Continue reading

Book Cover Designs, Necessary?

3330670980_bdf22aa4c9_o

I have a board on Pinterest entitled ‘Book Covers’, a fairly uncreative name but an accurate one. On that board I collect images of book covers I love the look of, barely paying attention to the actual books under the covers, or so I’ve recently found.

I like to think of book covers as clothes for books.

It doesn’t matter what you wear – it’s what’s on the inside that counts, your very person, your character. You can fool people into thinking you’re something you’re not but you can’t change what you are.

Continue reading

Risk of Reviews (Part One)

This post will be posted in three parts; risk of reader, risk of reviewer and risk to writer. 

Part One; Risk of Reader

I’ve recently found myself ever cautious of the books I choose to buy, partly because there’s only so much room in my university dorm but also because I’ve only so much money to spend on books (university is, unfortunately, quite expensive).

As such I’ve found myself spending an increasing amount of time fawning (which is only a slight hyperbole of the action) over reviews from strangers, hanging off of and believing every other word (I know not to believe them all).

Continue reading

To ‘Howl’ at Discomfort

8916195918_09e6299020_o2-e1422869771855

“A well-read woman is a dangerous creature”
                                                             — Lisa Kleypas

I first stumbled across Allen Ginsberg by accident; I had been browsing lyrical videos of poems online when ‘Howl’, one of his most well-known works, popped up under the ‘recommended for you’ bar. I clicked on it somewhat naively having never heard of the man before, nor his work. The poem, I found, was a mesmerising vortex that revealed all, no matter how painful.

Continue reading